Want to take part in our research?

We are currently looking for participants to help us with our research, the studies listed below are currently recruiting here at Cambridge.

Read about what is available for you or your family members below or feel free to call us for an informal chat. Participation in all studies involves visits to Cambridge. All reasonable travel costs and expenses will be reimbursed we just ask for your time and help with our research.

  • Studies for People with type 1 diabetes
  • Studies for family members
  • Interested to help with research in general? (ADDRESS-2 STUDY)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 5 years or older
    • Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes within the 6 months immediately prior to enrolment

    What’s it all about?

    The purpose of this study is to identify people newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes who might be interested in taking part in diabetes research studies. We want to collect information and blood samples to understand more about the development and progression of type 1 diabetes, and to help find suitable trials of new treatments or other studies into diabetes that you might want to take part in. When we find suitable trials or diabetes studies we will contact you to ask if you would be interested in taking part.

    New treatments are being developed for type 1 diabetes which aim to improve upon insulin given via injection. For example, new treatments have been designed to slow down or stop the body’s immune system from destroying its beta cells. We need people with diabetes to help test these treatments to find out whether they work or not. To test some treatments, we need to find suitable people soon after diagnosis, other treatments can be tested at a later stage post-diagnosis.

    We also need people with diabetes to help with other studies. For example, studies about how diabetes is managed, about diabetes education, or to investigate further what causes type 1 diabetes.

    What does it involve?

    We will hold an interview with you in a place and at a time that is convenient for you, for example, at one of your clinic appointments. We will ask about your diabetes, your medical history, and your family medical history. It will take about an hour or less. If you agree we will take a sample of your blood (20.5 ml, a little over a tablespoon). We will record your address so that we can contact you in the future to tell you about specific trials of new treatments or studies into diabetes, as they arise. We may ask you to contact any siblings you have who might be interested in the study.

    We will collect extra information relating to your diabetes now, from the time of your diagnosis and in the future from information about you that is held by the NHS (e.g. your medical notes) using your NHS number. This information will be collected by a researcher from the local study team.

    Further information about the study is available by contacting us directly.

  • Want to help develop new treatments? (IMCYSE's IMCY-0098 Study)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 18 to 30 years of age
    • Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes within the last 6 months

    What’s it all about?

    This study is evaluating an investigational medicinal product for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. An investigational medicinal product is a medicinal product that is still being studied to evaluate its efficacy, safety or mode of action.

    In people with type 1 diabetes cells of the body’s own immune system — which normally fight harmful bacteria and viruses — mistakenly destroy the insulin-producing (islet) cells in the pancreas. IMCY-0098 is a synthetic peptide (small protein), made in the laboratory which acts through the body’s immune system. It is being developed to stop the immunological destruction of insulin-producing cells. It acts like a vaccine and creates new cells that will specifically destroy those cells of the body’s own immune system that mistakenly destroy the insulin-producing (islet) cells in the pancreas. IMCY-0098 is therefore an immunotherapeutic agent that could potentially prevent and cure diseases mediated by inadequate immune responses such as type 1 diabetes.

    IMCY-0098 has never been administered to human beings before this study. This is why this study qualified as a First in Human Study. You will therefore be among the first patients treated with this product. Some study participants will receive a placebo instead (1 out of 4 people). The study is blinded so neither you nor the study team will know which product you receive until the end of the study.

    What does it involve?

    The study lasts up to 24 weeks from an initial screening visit. The first visit will need to be within 5 months from when you were told you had diabetes. Then there are 7 more study visits in total. IMCY-0098 is given in the same was as insulin via a small sub-cutaneous injection.  

    Between the hospital visits and up until the end of the study we will ask you to monitor your blood glucose using a freestyle libre system as well as complete a study diary and record your insulin usage.  

    At the hospital visits we will talk to you about your diabetes and your medical history as well as taking some bloods and urine samples. We will also ask you to complete some tests called  mixed meal tolerance tests which tell us how much insulin you are still producing.

    Further information about all the visits is available by contacting us directly.

  • Want to help develop new treatments? (NGM Biopharmaceuticals NGM217 Study)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 25 to 65 years of age
    • Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and using insulin for 2 years or more

    What’s it all about?

    The purpose of this research study is to look at the safety and tolerability of NGM217 in patients with Type 1 diabetes. NGM217 is a new drug being developed for the possible treatment of type 1 diabetes, which aims to give patients better glucose control, and as a result reduce the need for insulin.

    32 participants will take part in the study, at up to 9 different sites in the UK.

    This is a randomised controlled trial

    What does it involve?

    The study is due to last for up to 112 days. The first visit will begin up to 42 days before you are due to receive NGM217 or placebo. Once you receive the dose of NGM217 or placebo you will be assessed for 70 days.

    You will receive either NGM217 or an identical looking placebo (this will look the same as the study medication but will contain no active drug and have no effect), as a single injection just under the surface of the skin. There will be up to 4 groups, of 8 patients each taking part in this study.

    You will need to attend 9 study visits one of which will involve staying overnight in our the hospital research unit.

    At the hospital visits we will talk to you about your diabetes and your medical history as well as taking some bloods and urine samples. We will also ask you to complete some tests called  Mixed Meal Tolerance Tests which tell us how much insulin you are still producing.

    Between the hospital visits and up until the end of the study we will ask you to monitor your blood glucose using a freestyle libre Pro system (you will not receive feedback until after the study) as well as complete a study diary and record your insulin usage.

    Further information about all the visits is available by contacting us directly.

  • Want to help develop new diagnostic tools? (ADDRESS C-Peptide Study)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 18 years or older
    • Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes within the last 12 months
    • Previously enrolled on the ADDRESS-2 study (see other tab for this study details)

    What’s it all about?

    We want to understand how much insulin people with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes can still make, and how this changes over the first year following diagnosis because not enough is known about this. We also want to look at how it varies with factors such as age and the amount of insulin taken as treatment over the first year.

    We can assess the body’s ability to make insulin by measuring a protein called C-peptide, but there are different methods that can be used. We want to compare two methods in people who have had type 1 diabetes for less than a year. The methods have been compared before, but not concentrating on the first year following diagnosis and not in people belonging to different ethnic groups. C-peptide is produced by the beta cells of the pancreas at the same time that insulin is produced so we will measure the C-peptide using two methods and then compare their effectiveness. We will measure them in urine samples and also in the blood.

    What does it involve?

    The study involves just one morning visit to the hospital for about 4 hours. The visit will need to be within 12 months from when you were told you had diabetes.   

    At the hospital visit we will talk to you about your diabetes and your medical history as well as take some blood and urine samples. We will ask you to collect a urine sample at home the night before the test and then at the visit we will ask you to complete a test called mixed meal tolerance test as well as some questionnaires.   

    Further information about the study is available by contacting us directly.

  • Can you help with research? (ADDRESS-2 STUDY FOR SIBLINGS)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 5 years or older
    • Be the sibling of a person diagnosed with type 1 diabetes who has consented to enter the ADDRESS-2 study (Siblings must be free from diabetes).

    What’s it all about?

    The purpose of this study is to identify the brothers and sisters (siblings) of people with type 1 diabetes, who might be interested in taking part in diabetes research studies. We want to collect information to understand more about the development and progression of type 1 diabetes, and to help find suitable trials of new treatments or other studies into diabetes that you might want to take part in. When we find suitable trials or diabetes studies we will contact you to ask if you would be interested in taking part.

    Siblings of people with type 1 diabetes may be at greater risk of developing the disease than people with no family history of type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks its own insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is needed to control the level of sugar in the blood. The beta cells are gradually damaged and eventually the body cannot make insulin. This lack of insulin can be treated effectively with insulin injections.

    What does it involve?

    We will hold an interview with you at one of the hospitals involved in the study, or by phone, depending on what is convenient for you. We will ask about your medical history, and your family medical history. It will take about an hour or less.

    We will keep in contact with you by sending you occasional newsletters describing how our study has been used and how many people have joined

    Further information about the study is available by contacting us directly.

  • Screening to determine increased risk of developing type 1 (TRIALNET TN01 STUDY)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 3-45 years old and have a parent, brother/sister, or child with type 1 diabetes
    • Be between the ages of 3 and 20 and have an aunt/uncle, cousin, grandparent, niece/nephew, or half-brother/sister with type 1 diabetes (before they were aged 40)
    • have not been diagnosed with diabetes

    What’s it all about?

    The Pathway to Prevention screening study is the first step for all TrialNet prevention studies. Screening is offered free to relatives of people with type 1 diabetes to evaluate their personal risk of developing the disease. This unique screening can identify the early stages of T1D years before any symptoms appear. It also helps researchers learn more about how type 1 diabetes develops and plan new studies exploring ways to prevent it.

    If you are found to be in the early stages of type 1 diabetes, you may be able to join a research study looking for ways to slow down or stop the disease. We invite you to join our TrialNet family and help find a way to prevent type 1 diabetes.

    What does it involve?

    Screening is free, quick, convenient and super important. Only a small sample of blood (about half a teaspoon) is required. The sample can be collected at a TrialNet site or via your GP. For children we use a numbing solution that makes it practically painless. Results are ready in 4-6 weeks.

    • If your test results are negative, it means that no diabetes-related autoantibodies are present at this time and you are currently at lower risk than someone who tests positive. This is not a guarantee that you will never develop diabetes. Autoantibody status can change. Children whose test results are negative are encouraged to get rescreened every year until they reach age 18. We will send you a reminder letter when it is time to be rescreened.
    • If you test positive for one autoantibody, you may be at higher risk for T1D. Your next step is to come in for further testing. Depending on these test results, you may be able to join a prevention study or be closely monitored.
    • If you test positive for two or more autoantibodies, you are in the early stages of type 1 diabetes. Your next step is to come in for further testing. Depending on your test results, you may be able to join a prevention study or be closely monitored.  

    Further information about the study and visits is available by contacting us directly.

  • Abatacept for the prevention of type 1 in relatives at risk (TRIALNET TN18 STUDY)

    To be eligible for this study you must be:

    • 6-45 years old and be part of the Pathway to Prevention study (TN01 see above tab for study details)
    • Have 2 or more positive autoantibodies for type 1 diabetes
    • Have not been diagnosed with diabetes
    • Have normal glucose tolerance

    What’s it all about?

    The Pathway to Prevention screening study is able to determine close family members at an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. These individuals are potentially eligible to join this study.

    We know that development of type 1 diabetes occurs over time as the immune system destroys insulin producing cells. As this takes place, blood glucose values increase gradually until they are high enough to diagnose diabetes. Before this, blood glucose values may be higher than normal but not high enough to diagnosis. We call these “abnormal glucose levels”.

    The purpose of the study is to see if giving a medication called Abatacept can help delay or prevent the development of abnormal glucose levels and diabetes in people with normal glucose tolerance who have markers associated with risk of type 1 diabetes. The study is what we call a ‘randomised’ and ‘blinded’ study this means some people will receive Abatacept and some people will receive a placebo. Both you and the study team will not know until after the study which you received.

    What does it involve?

    You will be invited in for a screening visit to see if you are eligible to join the study. This visit takes about 3 hours and we will perform something called an ‘Oral Glucose Tolerance Test’ which involves drinking a sugary drink then having some blood tests.  We will also talk to you about your medical history and take some other blood and urine tests.

    If you are determined to be eligible for the study from this visit you will be asked to attend for treatment visits to receive the drug (or placebo) which is given 14 times over the course of a year. It is given via intravenous infusion. All visits are performed as out patient visits.

    During this time we will continue to monitor you for signs of development of type 1 diabetes and once competed you will enter the monitoring phase of the study. During the monitoring phase you will have visits every six months. The exact duration of the study is not known. We anticipate that your participation will be no longer than 5-6 years.

    Further information about the study and visits is available by contacting us directly.

     

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